Stepping Away from Feminists

I have a feeling this will be one of my least popular posts yet. I feel it now.

Here goes.

It all started when I came across a post about “Sexual Racism”. It is basically the premise that if you aren’t sexually attracted to people of a certain race it isn’t personal preference, it’s you being racist. Yea. Smell the bullshit coming off that.

I have identified as feminist since I was pretty young. It was more I got called a feminist (not in a bad way) and I was just kinda like “yea, that’s right!”.

I am by no means a Social Justice Warrior. I’m not politically correct a lot of the time. Don’t get me wrong (usually) I don’t purposely hurt anyone’s feelings but some of this shit is getting ridiculous.

At first I was thinking it was the 3rd wave feminism that was giving me the urge to leave. But the more research I do, the more I realize that it really isn’t them as a whole. Mostly because the title third wave feminism gets used incorrectly. Basically treating it like something brand new when in reality third wave feminism started in the early to mid 90’s.

Here is a short break down of the waves.

First wave:

The first wave of feminism took place in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, emerging out of an environment of urban industrialism and liberal, socialist politics. The goal of this wave was to open up opportunities for women, with a focus on suffrage.

Second:

The second wave began in the 1960s and continued into the 90s. This wave unfolded in the context of the anti-war and civil rights movements and the growing self-consciousness of a variety of minority groups around the world. The New Left was on the rise, and the voice of the second wave was increasingly radical. In this phase, sexuality and reproductive rights were dominant issues, and much of the movement’s energy was focused on passing the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution guaranteeing social equality regardless of sex.

You can thank the second wave for Sex and gender differentiation—the former being biological, and the later a social construct that varies culture-to-culture and over time.

Third:

The third wave of feminism began in the mid-90’s and was informed by post-colonial and post-modern thinking. In this phase many constructs were destabilized, including the notions of “universal womanhood,” body, gender, sexuality and heteronormativity. An aspect of third wave feminism that mystified the mothers of the earlier feminist movement was the readoption by young feminists of the very lip-stick, high-heels, and cleavage proudly exposed by low cut necklines that the first two phases of the movement identified with male oppression. Pinkfloor expressed this new position when she said that it’s possible to have a push-up bra and a brain at the same time. The “grrls” of the third wave stepped onto the stage as strong and empowered, eschewing victimization and defining feminine beauty for themselves as subjects, not as objects of a sexist patriarchy. They developed a rhetoric of mimicry, which appropriated derogatory terms like “slut” and “bitch” in order to subvert sexist culture and deprive it of verbal weapons. The web is an important tool of “girlie feminism.”

Got this information here. Looking around this seems to be accurate.

Basically what it boils down to is each wave was for issues of that time being handled in a way realistic for that time. The second wave wasn’t fighting for women’s right to vote because it was already done, so they moved on to issues like getting fair work, being in charge of their own bodies, etc. The third wave is really no different, just moving on to the next problem.

What I believe really is the problem is the trend I’m seeing in (unfortunately) my generation and the next.

Some how we have cultivated new generations of whiney babies that think because someone has said something that upsets them that they have the right to tell them to not say that thing (ie. “triggered). That instead of having conversations and discussions with apposing views they just go on the attack because how do someone disagree with them and that person is a terrible person for thinking incorrectly.

I was looking at an article about Halloween costumes and cultural appropriation on a feminist page (this is not a feminist issue by the way). Some of it I agree to like Native American costumes (because they are very stereotypical not “cultural appropriation”) but others like women wearing saris. Actually the sari part is the one I commented about specifically. I go to Ren Faire every year I can and every time there is an Indian couple (as in they themselves migrated from India to here) that sell saris and lots of belly dancing gear. This last year I went he was very active in trying to sell me (a very white girl) one that I had shown some interest in. Also commenting that I don’t take well to people trying to tell me what I can and cannot wear.

The comments I got were wow. Some were in agreement. Others called that couple sell outs and that in every culture there are sell outs, one told me my name was an insult to dogs (referring to Silverwolf) and other insulting comments. All, by the way, were from women just as white as me. The insults didn’t hurt my feelings, I have much thicker skin than that. It has officially put me off to the community in whole because this wasn’t the first time that not only did people resort to insults because I had a disagreeing opinion but because not a single one actually wanted to have a discussion about it. Just wanted to insult me to try to shut me up.

This Social Justice Warrior trend is what I’m speaking of. They are intent on sacrificing free speech in the name of political correctness.

Perfect example.

Here is a great article on the whole thing that highly suggest, though it is more focused at colleges.

They want their way. Their way of thinking is the only right way, and you are dehumanized to nothing but some form of privilege if you disagree.

It seems the way to bring yourself or a certain group up, they want to bring others down.

On the specific subject of feminism, there is a lot of attacks on men.

As a whole, I love men. Now there are specific men I don’t like, and some I even hate but it that is because of their own actions. Not because they are men.

I don’t agree with everything in this article, but it is still good.

I’m fed up with it, and I’m done.

This is really the only thing I’m going to post on this.

I am not changing. The same problems are still important to me (lgbt, public breastfeeding, etc), but I will not longer be using the term feminist. I have no interest in being a part of the community any longer because I don’t want to be associated with these people.

I wasn’t planning on this post being so ranty but oh well.

Bring on the pitchforks and torches.

My little brother likes to say my catch phrase is “I do what I want”, so….

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3 thoughts on “Stepping Away from Feminists

  1. Pitchforks and torches? That sounds like a wonderful way to toast some marshmallows! Seriously, I fully agree with your views when it comes to the prevalence of people who would sacrifice free speech for political correctness. When everyone engages in free speech, it’s easier to distinguish between the people you agree with from the ones you don’t … when everyone masks their thoughts behind a facade of political correctness, you get surprised whenever the facade slips (as it eventually must). Forcing people to agree to a common belief or perspective has been tried before … it is essentially the very same thing that feminism has been confronting since what you describe here as the first wave.

    I think it is commendable that you have realized you can still tackle the issues that are important to you without wearing a feminist badge. Equality (not just gender-based), and a cessation to the notion that the female body (or human body, for that matter) is something to feel ashamed of, are very important issues to me. I am not a feminist. I am not a social justice warrior, either. I’m just some guy who thinks the world as it now is, isn’t nearly as fair as it should be; and I have no problem pointing out unfairness when I see it. From what I have seen, there are a lot of feminists who seem to think that the first and best tactic is to fight fire with fire, when maybe water would be the more logical way to go.

    I wish you luck with your new approach – please know that you aren’t alone with your assessment of the situation. And how is your name an insult to dogs? I still haven’t figured that one out ….

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Gosh, darn, I’m old enough to be a charter member of the second wave; yet, I was never a part of the visible sector. My major issues were getting women control over their own bodies, equal education to men’s (yes, women could not go to the military academies at the beginning of the period), the ability to go to the moon if they wanted. Tie-dye &c. was never a part of my vision. That’s another reason why I laugh (pardon me, please) at “hippie neo-pagans.” They are just as wishy-washy about their religion as they are about most of their lives. My word, why can’t the leader of Circle Sanctuary look like someone serious? So, yes, I am elitist. Individual relationships are just that, too. I have my preferences in things I like to do (museums/concerts/ballet/opera/etc). If you don’t fit into that, then I probably won’t be interested in you (male individual). Then comes the level of restaurant I enjoy. I am not vegetarian/vegan. This is another no-no. Is he devoutly Christian or Muslim? That is a huge NO-NO. However, I also would not like an atheist, either. 😉 As can be seen from this little list, things do tend to get whittled down rather quickly. I think I would only go ten years younger……

    Liked by 2 people

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